About Thyroid Conditions

Have you been told your labs are normal only to suffer with the same thyroid symptoms you had before you began hormone therapy? Are you aware that EVERY cell in your body has receptor sites for thyroid hormone? Are you aware that the most common cause of hypothyroidism is NOT a problem in your thyroid gland but in your immune system? If your immune system is attacking your thyroid what ELSE is it attacking?

This very important component of the body has a direct impact on the metabolism that is experienced in the body. Individuals that suffer from issues with this gland may suffer from several different health complications. These include, but are not at all limited to, issues with the weight, the mood, and the energy that is experienced by the person.

Here are some common warning signs:

  • Fatigue
  • Increase in weight gain even with low calorie diet
  • Morning headaches that wear off as the day progresses
  • Depression
  • Constipation
  • Overly sensitive to cold weather
  • Poor circulation and numbness in hands and feet
  • Muscle cramps while at rest
  • Catches colds and other viral/bacterial problems easily and has difficulty recovering
  • Wounds heal slowly
  • Require excessive amount of sleep to function properly
  • Chronic digestive problems (hypochlorhydria)
  • Itchy dry skin
  • Dry or brittle hair
  • Hair falls out easily
  • Edema, especially facial (myxedema)
  • Loss of outside portion of eyebrows

Many individuals experience symptoms of thyroid disease and do not even realize that the experiences they are having could indicate a potentially dangerous complication. The thyroid is a relatively small gland that is located in the lower region of the neck. Its sole responsibility is to secrete certain hormones throughout the body. There are two specific hormones that are released by this specific gland.

The first is known as “Thyroxine” or “T4? and the second is known as “Triiodothyronine” or “T3?. The hormones that are released are responsible for delivering energy to the various cells in the body. There are many complications that may occur with the thyroid.

The implications of the thyroid on the rest of your body are vast.

The thyroid directly supports the following systems:

  • Bone metabolism
  • Immune System
  • Brain/Nervous System
  • Endocrine System (adrenal glands, ovaries, testes)
  • Gastrointestinal function
  • Liver and gallbladder
  • Growth/Sex hormones
  • Fat Burning
  • Insulin and Glucose Metabolism
  • Healthy cholesterol levels
  • Proper stomach acid

Thyroid “Cross Talk”

The thyroid relies upon other organs and systems just as these systems rely upon it. We call this “cross talk” between the systems. “Cross Talk” happens between the following systems:

Thyroid &  Immune System

Thyroid & Gut

Thyroid & Brain

Thyroid & Endocrine System

One affects the other!

Thyroid Basics

The Hypothalamus sends signal to pituitary gland via TRH. The Pituitary gland send signal to Thyroid via TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone). TSH causes enzyme TPO to stimulate release of T4 (93%) and T3 (7%).  These hormones ride the “taxi cab”- thyroid binding globulin (TBG)

Thyroid Hormone Conversion

In the liver 60% of T4 is converted to T3.  Poor liver function will cause poor T4 to T3 conversion. 20% of T4 is sent to gut to be converted to T3. If you have poor gut flora it will cause poor conversion of T4 to T3. Also, 20% ofT4 is sent to peripheral cells for conversion to T3 using 5’diodianaze enzyme. A small percentage T4 goes to Reverse T3.

Click here for an explanatory chart on this path: thyroid chart slide

A true thyroid functional test

Are you aware that there are 11 lab markers to properly evaluate your thyroid yet almost all doctors only order two?

  • TSH (this is what conventionally is ordered)
  • Total T4 (Thyroxine)

But what about these tests?

  • Total T4 (thyroxine)
  • FTI (free thyroxine index) (amount of T4 available)
  • FT4 (free throxine) (affected by prescription drugs)
  • T3 Uptake (How much of T3 is taken up by TBG)
  • FT3 (free triodothyroxine) (Active Thyroid Hormone)
  • Reverse T3 (Body can not use)
  • TPO and TBG Antibodies (Hashimotos)
  • TSH Antibodies (Graves Disease)
  • TBG levels

How can you manage health without all the information? Burning out the thyroid gland with hormone replacement is a 50 year old model.

In order to manage your health you need to look at the causes of the problem…not just the symptoms.